Kim Dotcom Extradition to Go Ahead, But Not on Copyright Grounds

The New Zealand High Court today ruled that Kim Dotcom can be extradited to the US, but it won't be on copyright grounds. After months of deliberation, Justice Murray Gilbert agreed with the US Government's position that this is a fraud case at its core, an offense that is extraditable. Dotcom says he will fight on.

Search Engines and Rightsholders Sign Landmark Anti-Piracy Deal

After well over half a decade of backroom meetings facilitated by the UK Government, search engines and major rightsholder groups have signed an anti-piracy agreement. Both sides agreed on a deal in which search engines will delist and demote pirated content, faster and more effectively than before. The voluntary agreement, targeted at UK consumers, is the first of its kind in the world but appears to offer little new.

Is Megaupload’s ‘Crime’ a Common Cloud Hosting Practice?

Opinion

Five years ago the US Government launched a criminal case against Megaupload and several of its former employees. One of the main allegations in the indictment is that the site only deleted links to copyright-infringing material, not the actual files. Interestingly, this isn't too far off from what cloud hosting providers such as Google Drive and Dropbox still do today.

Judge Splits $750 Piracy Penalty Between BitTorrent Peers

News

A District Court judge in Seattle has taken a novel approach in a series of default judgments targeting alleged BitTorrent pirates. Since the defendants are accused of sharing files in the same swarm, they should also share the penalty among each other, the judge argues. According to the order, these cases are not intended to provide a windfall to filmmakers.

Study: 70% of Young Swedish Men Are Video Pirates

News

A new study from Sweden has found that just over half of all young people admit to obtaining movies and TV shows from the Internet without paying, a figure that rockets to 70% among young men. With The Pirate Bay about to be blocked by one ISP with more to follow, can piracy rates be controlled?