The Pirate Bay Appeal Starts Tomorrow

Last year The Pirate Bay Four were sentenced to a year in prison, and each ordered to pay $905,000 in damages. Tomorrow the appeal of the trial will start, but unlike last time there is is an awkward silence in the media, blogs and even on The Pirate Bay. Is this the proverbial calm before the storm, or perhaps a change of course?

High-Profile, High Damages File-Sharing ‘Conviction’ Was a Farce

In 2008, lawyers Davenport Lyons courted the mainstream media with the news that a court had found a woman guilty of sharing the game Dream Pinball 3D, an action which cost her around £16,000. Anyone with an understanding of these cases knew that something was wrong and now, thanks to yet more information from the leaked ACS:Law emails, we learn that this 'conviction' was built on foundations of sand.

Leaked Emails Reveal Profits of Anti-Piracy Cash Scheme

Friday night the anti-piracy law firm ACS:Law accidentally published its entire email archive online, effectively revealing how the company managed to extract over a million dollars (£636,758.22) from alleged file-sharers since its operation started. On average, 30% of the victims who were targeted paid up, and this money was divided between the law firm, the copyright holder and the monitoring company.

ACS:Law (Gay) Porn Letters Target Pensioners, Married Men

Last night, the private emails of anti-piracy law firm ACS:Law were spilled onto the Internet. Today, as we continue to dig through the mountain of information, we take a look at some of the human victims of this scheme. From poor people pleading for clemency, to bewildered old age pensioners accused of sharing adult movies, to married men who have been confronted with allegations of sharing gay porn, the cost is significant.

ACS:Law Anti-Piracy Law Firm Torn Apart By Leaked Emails

Earlier this week, anti-piracy lawyers ACS:Law had their website taken down by a 4chan DDoS attack. Adding insult to injury, owner Andrew Crossley was harassed at home in the middle of the night by prank phone calls. Now, through a fault with his website, hundreds of megabytes of private emails have been exposed to the public and uploaded to The Pirate Bay. To those hoping that this is a MediaDefender-type fiasco all over again, trust us - it is.

US ISP Disconnects Alleged Pirates for 6 Months

The United States Internet Service provider Suddenlink has effectively implemented a three-strikes policy for repeated copyright infringers. After three DMCA notices, alleged copyright infringers are disconnected from the Internet for six months, without a refund. According to a company representative, the DMCA requires them to take such drastic measures.

Producer Sues BitTorrent Users, But Doesn’t ‘Own’ Copyright

The avalanche of lawsuits against BitTorrent users in the United States continues. Several adult producers joined in on the profitable pay-up-or-else scheme recently, but one of them made a costly mistake. Adult producer Mick Haig filed suits against 670 BitTorrent users this week. However, he forgot to register the copyright for his film.