Court: Google Can See Emails About MPAA’s Secret ‘SOPA Revival’

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Google is entitled to see internal communication between the MPAA and Mississippi State Attorney General Jim Hood, a federal court has ruled. Hood previously called for SOPA-like Internet filters in the U.S. and is accused of doing Hollywood's dirty work.

mailgIn backroom meetings the MPAA and Mississippi State Attorney General Jim Hood discussed a plan to bring website blocking and search engine filtering back to the table after the controversial SOPA law failed to pass.

The plan, dubbed “Project Goliath,” became public through various emails that were released during the Sony Pictures leaks. In a response Google said that it was “deeply concerned” about the developments.

To counter the looming threat Google filed a complaint against Hood last December, asking the court to prevent Hood from enforcing a subpoena that addresses Google’s failure to take down or block access to illegal content, including pirate sites.

This resulted in a victory for Google with District Court Judge Henry Wingate putting the subpoena on hold. At the same time Google requested additional details from the Attorney General on his discussions with Hollywood.

During an oral hearing earlier this month Google requested various documents including an email conversation between MPAA’s Senior Vice President State Legislative Affairs Vans Stevenson and the Attorney General.

In addition, Google asked for copies of Word files titled Google can take action, Google must change its behavior, Google’s illegal conduct, CDA, and any documents gathered in response to a request previously submitted by Techdirt’s Mike Masnick .

After a careful review District Court Judge Henry Wingate sided with Google, ordering Attorney General Hood to hand over the requested information before the end of the month.

Judge Wingate’s order

hoodorder

The documents will help Google to get to the bottom of the censorship efforts and to determine what role the MPAA played and what its contributions were.

Various emails that leaked after the Sony hack already revealed that the MPAA’s long-standing law firm Jenner & Block had drafted a subpoena and other communication the Attorney General could use against Google.

Many of the “Project Goliath” emails and documents are readily available after Wikileaks released them late last week, but nearly all details had already been made public after the leaks first surfaced.

Interestingly, in one email the MPAA’s Vans Stevenson linked to a New York Times piece on how lobbyists court State Attorneys to advance their political agendas.

“FYI, first is a series of articles,” Stevenson wrote to several high level executives involved, not knowing that a follow-up would include “Project Goliath.”

Perhaps fittingly, New York Times’ journalist Eric Lipton won a Pulitzer prize for the series yesterday, for reporting “how the influence of lobbyists can sway congressional leaders and state attorneys general, slanting justice toward the wealthy and connected.”

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