Music Companies Sue ISP Bright House for Failing to Disconnect Pirates

News

A group of major music companies including Sony, Universal, and Warner Bros, has sued Internet provider Bright House Networks for failing to disconnect repeat infringers. The ISP, which was acquired by Charter three years ago, knowingly profited from the massive volumes of copyright infringement committed by its users, the companies state. With thousands of tracks as evidence, the potential damages exceed a billion dollars.

Which VPN Services Keep You Anonymous in 2019?

Opinion

People who are in need of a VPN service have plenty of options to choose from. Most services offer decent encryption options nowadays, but what more does your VPN provider do to keep you anonymous? We take a look at the logging policies plus other privacy and security features of dozens of VPN providers.

ISPs: We’re Definitely Not the Internet Police, Until We Decide We Should Be

Opinion

For mainly legal reasons, it's prudent for ISPs to describe themselves as dumb pipes, with no control over or responsibility for the content that traverses their networks. The reality is, however, that is not only an untruth but a stance that can be undone in an instant, should emotions run high enough. Trouble is, no important actions exist in a bubble.

Google Unlocked Aims to ‘Uncensor’ Google Search Results

News

Google Unlocked is a new extension for Chrome and Opera that attempts to 'uncensor' Google search results affected by DMCA notices. While it tends to work as advertised overall, it suffers from - surprise, surprise - an inability to distinguish between infringing and non-infringing URLs.

Hollywood Fears that Stream-Ripper Verdict Will Serve as Roadmap for Foreign Pirates

News

Hollywood's MPAA has submitted an amicus curiae brief in support of several major record labels, hoping to overturn a verdict in favor of the stream ripping sites FLVTO.biz and 2Conv.com. The group fears that the verdict will serve as a roadmap for foreign pirates who want to evade US Courts. Unlike the District Court concluded, the MPAA says the sites are "quintessentially commercial."